Canadian News May 12, 2021 2:10 PM EST

Former CRTC vice-chair says Bill C-10 would 'violate the rights of ordinary citizens'

"It leaves most definitions regarding scope and indeed of social media itself entirely up to the CRTC and its nine appointed commissioners," Menzies said.

Former CRTC vice-chair says Bill C-10 would 'violate the rights of ordinary citizens'
Roberto Wakerell-Cruz Montreal, QC
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Former vice-chair of the CRTC Peter Menzies once again came out in strong opposition to the Trudeau Liberals' Bill-C10, calling a bill a violation "of the rights of ordinary citizens."

According to Blacklock's Reporter, Menzies made the comments during an online seminar hosted by the Macdonald-Laurier Institute titled "Who Polices Free Speech Online?"

During the meeting, Menzies explained that the bill, which was spearheaded by Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault, would "impose itself on the free expression rights of Canadians by making their posts subject to government oversight."

"It leaves most definitions regarding scope and indeed of social media itself entirely up to the CRTC and its nine appointed commissioners," Menzies said.

"Overall it ensures that going forward all Canadians communicating over the internet will do so under the guise of the state. In doing so, this opens a door that in my view should remain closed," he continued.

"It creates two classes of communicators in Canada, government approved and non-government approved. And government approved will get better access and be dominant, and the government-unapproved won't."

"It's one of those things, it's so subtle. You don't know it's happening if you're a casual observer. But it's there and it's happening all the time."

Menzies noted that the bill's loosely written terms would suppress consumers, in an attempt to fix a "non-existent" problem.

Earlier this week, members  of the House of Commons heritage committee voted 11-0 to summon the heritage minister to suspend the bill until he explains it. This due to concerns that the bill would violate Canadians' charter rights.

"I was happy to see the committee finally came together to find common ground. We remain committed to do everything in our power to level the playing field between creators and web giants," Liberal MP Julie Dabrusin told The Toronto Star.

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