BREAKING: Motive for explosion on US/Canada Rainbow Bridge unclear: eyewitness accounts and USBP assessment

One witness told reporters that the car was airborne around 10 to 15 feet before hitting the building.

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Hannah Nightingale Washington DC
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The motive that led to an explosion on the US/Canada border Rainbow Bridge is unclear, after eyewitnesses reported seeing the driver of the vehicle drive recklessly leading up to the incident. Later reports confirmed that this was not a terror attack, and likely was an accident.

One witness told reporters that the car was airborne around 10 to 15 feet before hitting the building.

Another witness told WGRZ that the car was traveling upwards of 100 mph before striking a fence and being launched airborne. He said the next thing he saw was the fireball.

Sources familiar with the matter told Reuters that early assessments point to a reckless driver.

Early reports stated that the incident was a possible terrorist attack.



This article has been updated to reflect ongoing developments.
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