ADVERTISEMENT

Chuck Schumer forgets first black Justice Thurgood Marshall in demand for more 'diverse' Supreme Court

Schumer praised the Senate for confirming so many black women to the federal court, stating that until 1981, not a single black man or woman had been confirmed to serve on the Supreme Court.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Democrat Sen. Chuck Schumer, who’s currently serving as the House Majority Leader, spoke on the topic of appointing a new Justice to the Supreme Court following Justice Stephen Breyer’s retirement.

In a speech on the Senate floor on Thursday, Schumer praised the Senate for confirming so many black women to the federal court, stating that until 1981, not a single black man or woman had been confirmed to serve on the Supreme Court.

“In the president’s pledge to name a black woman to the Supreme Court is historic. There have been 115 justices who’ve sat on the court since 1789, only 5 of them have ever been women. None until 1981. Only two have been African American. But never, never has there been African American women who still make up barely 6 percent of the federal judiciary,” said Schumer.

“And amazing, until 1981 this powerful body, the Supreme Court, was all white men. Imagine. America wasn't all white men in 1981, or ever.”

“Under President Biden and this Senate majority, we're taking historic steps to make the courts look more like the country they serve by confirming highly qualified diverse nominees. A quarter of all African American women who sit on the federal bench was nominated by this administration and approved by this Senate. Just hear that,” he continued.

“25 percent of African American women who sit on the federal bench came through this Senate, this year. That’s the progress we’ve made in a relatively short amount of time.”

The problem with Schumer’s claim is that it’s flat out incorrect. Thurgood Marshall was confirmed as the first African American to serve as a Supreme Court justice on August 30, 1967, in a 69-11 vote.

Furthermore, Schumer’s assessment that there are not enough Black women serving in courtrooms is about a percentage point off. As black women make up roughly 6 to 7 percent of the US population, there is a proportional number of black women on the bench.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
N/A by N/A is licensed under N/A

Join and support independent free thinkers!

We’re independent and can’t be cancelled. The establishment media is increasingly dedicated to divisive cancel culture, corporate wokeism, and political correctness, all while covering up corruption from the corridors of power. The need for fact-based journalism and thoughtful analysis has never been greater. When you support The Post Millennial, you support freedom of the press at a time when it's under direct attack. Join the ranks of independent, free thinkers by supporting us today for as little as $1.

Support The Post Millennial

Remind me in September

We will use this to send you a single email in September 2020. To find out what personal data we collect and how we use it, please visit our Privacy Policy

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy
ADVERTISEMENT
© 2022 The Post Millennial, Privacy Policy