American News Oct 13, 2020 1:00 PM EST

FBI raids postal carrier's home and seizes trash bags full of mail

On the curb outside of Sean Troesch's home in Baldwin, Pennsylvania, trash bags full of United States Postal Service mail have been left out for garbage collection.

FBI raids postal carrier's home and seizes trash bags full of mail
Leonardo Briceno Virginia, US
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On the curb outside of Sean Troesch's home in Baldwin, Pennsylvania, trash bags full of United States Postal Service mail have been left out for garbage collection.

At a time when people are casting their ballots for the presidential race through the mail, this is especially concerning to the USPS and a blow to the agency's credibility.

Over the weekend, Federal agents raided Troesch's home after having received a tip that similar bags had been left for disposal over past weeks.

This wouldn't appear to be the first time Troesch has attempted to deliver mail to a landfill. One neighbor took a picture of more than eight black bags sitting on the side of the road just over two weeks ago.

Troesch, a non-active employee of the Postal Service, is now under Federal investigation.

The discarding of US Postal Service mail belonging to someone else is a serious offense. According to legal researchers at FindLaw, the opening or the destruction of someone else's mail is an "obstruction of correspondence"—an offense punishable by up to five years in prison with additional fines.

According to CBS, the US Postal Service Office of Inspector General released a statement, assuring audiences that the discovered mail would be sorted:

"Special agents recovered several different types of mail, including business mail, flats, and small amounts of first-class mail. We expect to perform a piece of count of the mail tomorrow, and make arrangements to have mail delivered to customers as soon as possible."

Troesch's attempt to discard federal mail comes on the heals of other reports that postal employees have attempted to dispose of essential correspondence. On Wednesday, The New York Times reported how Nicholas Beauchene, a 26-year old Postal Service employee in New Jersey, had discarded as many as 633 pieces of mail—including nearly 100 mail-in ballots.

While Troesch awaits charges, US Postal Service Office of Inspector General is turning his case over to the US Attorneys’ Office.

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