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Hunter Biden makes his first art sales for $375,000

Buyers of the young Biden's artwork are reportedly being kept anonymous from both Biden and the administration, but many have raised questions regarding the ethics of the president's son selling artwork to potentially high-ranking officials around the world.

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Hannah Nightingale Washington DC
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Budding artist and President Joe Biden's controversial son Hunter Biden has reportedly sold at least five prints of his original artwork priced at $75,000 per piece, a grand total of $375,000.

According to the New York Post, The Georges Berges Gallery reportedly sold the prints ahead of the Oct. 1 opening of a pop-up presentation in Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles event had roughly 200 people in attendance including boxer "Sugar Ray" Leonard, the city's Mayor Eric Garcetti, musician Moby, and visual artist Shepard Fairey.

It is unclear who bought the pieces, with a source familiar with the matter telling the New York Post "but most of those allowed to buy works are long-term, private collectors with the gallery, people that Berges knows personally."

Buyers of the young Biden's artwork are reportedly being kept anonymous from both Biden and the administration, but many have raised questions regarding the ethics of the president's son selling artwork to potentially high-ranking officials around the world.

"The ethicist who pointed to this arrangement have expressed concern that the President's son selling art could potentially put the president in a situation where those who seek jobs under this administration or favors from this administration could put this White House in an awkward position," one reporter told Psaki in a press conference this week.

Despite efforts to maintain the anonymity of buyers, Biden's appearance at the LA exhibition have raised questions with experts, who say the appearance negates the attempts at anonymity.

Richard Painter, who was President George W. Bush's chief ethics lawyer, said the LA opening "just illustrates how this veil-of-secrecy idea is not happening."

"It shows the deal's not going to be secret," Painter said. "I think the White House needs to go to Plan B."

Ahead of Biden's New York City show, which has been pushed back to the spring of next year, those wishing to attend are reportedly having to go through extensive screening measures.

"It is a whole process to get in to see the Biden show. You have to call the gallery in Soho, and they are vetting people carefully," the source told the New York Post.

"They laid down rules that thorough vetting of any collector has to be done by a team of lawyers," the source continued, though noting that it is unclear who hired the lawyers, the purpose of the vetting, and the reason for the delayed opening.

Painter, who noted that the NYC show will have everyone talking, said it would be best for Biden to wait to sell his artwork until his father is out of office, in order to prevent anyone from gaining leverage over the administration by paying the exorbitant prices the artwork is going for — upwards of $500,000.

"Barring that, Painter said, there should be 'full transparency' of the buyers' identities and President Biden and his appointees should all sign 'recusal' pledges 'to ensure these people can't get access to the White House,'" the New York Post wrote.

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