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New York Times erases successful black man who produced Rush Limbaugh's shows

The New York Times’ obituary identified Limbaugh’s producer as an enigmatic, possibly made-up person – as implied by the paper’s description of the man, referring to him as an “unheard voice of someone he called ‘Bo Snerdly.’”

Ian Miles Cheong Montreal, QC
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Following the passing of Rush Limbaugh, conservative icon and talk radio broadcaster, the New York Times’ obituary identified Limbaugh’s producer as an enigmatic, possibly made-up person – as implied by the paper’s description of the man, referring to him as an “unheard voice of someone he called ‘Bo Snerdly.’”

“Unlike Howard Stern, Don Imus and other big names in shock radio, Mr. Limbaugh had no on-the-air sidekicks, though he had conversations with the unheard voice of someone he called ‘Bo Snerdly,’” the Times wrote. “Nor did he have writers, scripts or outlines, just notes and clippings from newspapers he perused daily.”

Far from being a fiction of Limbaugh’s apparently broad imagination, a quick Google search for “Bo Snerdly” brings up Bo Snerdley, the pseudonym of James Golden, Limbaugh’s screener, producer, and engineer. Wikipedia states that Golden, aka Bo Snerdley, “has been a Producer/Executive for Premiere Networks, the largest radio syndication company in the United States” since 2001.

Golden is, it should be noted, a black man – making this yet another instance of the “anti-racist” liberal media erasing a successful black man.

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