Use code TPM for up to 66% off at MyPillow.com

ADVERTISEMENT

With 'Two Michaels' back home, Foreign Minister Garneau outlines new government approach to China relations

As the Two Michaels touched down on Canadian soil, ending a standoff which put Canada-China relations in a deep freeze, Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garenau said his government is under "no illusions" when approaching a normalization of relations with China.

ADVERTISEMENT
Image
Adam Dobrer Vancouver
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

As the Two Michaels touched down on Canadian soil, ending a standoff, which put Canada-China relations in a deep freeze, Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garenau said his government is under "no illusions" when approaching a normalization of relations with China.

In a Sunday interview on Rosemary Barton Live, Garneau said that "there was no path to a relationship with China as long as the two Michaels were being detained." Their detention was widely percieved as retaliation for the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver in December, 2018 in connection with violations of American sanctions against Iran. The Foreign Minister admitted as much, saying that "it's very clear... that the immediate return of the 'two Michaels' linked to the Meng Wanzhou case in a very direct manner."

Fresh off a Federal election, the Trudeau government outlined its approach to China. Asked about next steps, Garneau said that Canada's "eye are wide open" and that the Trudeau government is adopting a 'four-fold' approach to diplomatict relations with China: "coexist", "compete, "co-operate and "challenge."

Speaking later on Global News' The West Block, Garneau told host Mercedes Stephenson that Canada's relationship with China is "continually evolving" and that two will still co-exist.“We will compete. We will cooperate in areas where we need to cooperate, such as climate change, and we will challenge China, whether it’s on human rights or whether it’s on arbitrary detention, when appropriate,” he said.

The timing of these remarks is noteworthy, coming just days after President Biden's selection for ambassador to Ottawa, David Cohen, testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Commitee stating that  "[Americans] are all waiting for Canada to release its framework for its overall China policy," and that "as ambassador, if confirmed, it's an appropriate role to be engaged in discussions and make sure that Canada's policies reflect its words in terms of treatment of China."

There are several key areas of friction where Canada and the United States remain out of sync on China policy: Trudeau's cabinet abstained from a vote to declare China's treatment of Uighurs a 'genocide', and Canada remains the only country in the 'Five Eyes' intelligence sharing alliance not to have banned Chinese telecom giant Huawei from bidding on contracts for 5G infrastructure.

When pressed on the Huawei 5G issue , Garneau said the federal government “will” make a decision, but did not provide further details. “Our primary consideration is ensuring the security of our telecommunication system,” he said. “And when we’re ready to make that decision, we will make it.”


ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
N/A by N/A is licensed under N/A

Join and support independent free thinkers!

We’re independent and can’t be cancelled. The establishment media is increasingly dedicated to divisive cancel culture, corporate wokeism, and political correctness, all while covering up corruption from the corridors of power. The need for fact-based journalism and thoughtful analysis has never been greater. When you support The Post Millennial, you support freedom of the press at a time when it's under direct attack. Join the ranks of independent, free thinkers by supporting us today for as little as $1.

Support The Post Millennial

Remind me in September

We will use this to send you a single email in September 2020. To find out what personal data we collect and how we use it, please visit our Privacy Policy

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy
ADVERTISEMENT
© 2022 The Post Millennial, Privacy Policy