American News May 5, 2021 3:11 PM EST

WATCH: CNN host suggests SHUNNING people who don't get vaccinated

Smerconish also asked his readers if Americans should shun other Americans who haven't been vaccinated. 7,241 of them responded and 73% of them said YES.

WATCH: CNN host suggests SHUNNING people who don't get vaccinated
Hannah Nightingale Washington DC
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In a clip from a segment on "struggling to get to herd immunity," CNN host Michael Smerconish, quoting a law professor, spoke about the need for both positive and negative motivation for Americans to get their vaccination.

Smerconish went so far as to suggest shunning Americans who decide not to get vaccinated may be the answer:

Smerconish also asked his readers if Americans should shun other Americans who haven't been vaccinated. 7,241 of them responded and 73% of them said YES.

Is it time to start shunning the “vaccine hesitant”? (Percentage of 7,241 votes)

"Without a better carrot or stick, many Americans won't get vaccinated and we will suffer more death and dislocation, wrote law professor Shanin Spencer in a Smerconish.com article.

In the April 28 article titled Is Our Vacination Strategy Correct, Spencer stresses the importance of getting more Americans vaccinated, and suggests the use of a better "carrot," positive motivation, and "stick," negative motivation, to get more shots into Americans arms.

He also pushes for the use of vaccination passports, saying "Vaccine passes are working well in Israel, where proof of vaccination is required for travel, education, concerts and other venues. They hold the promise to work well here too, which would also encourage vaccination by placing a tangible cost on not getting a vaccine."

Spencer adds some common objections people have to vaccination and the passes, addressing those who say the vaccine is forces and those who say the vaccine isn't available.

"However, we require childhood vaccinations for a variety of maladies. And permitting a medical or religious exemption for the COVID-19 vaccine safeguards an appropriate level of personal freedom," wrote Spencer. When addressing those who say the vaccine isn't widely available, Spencer wrote "that will lose resonance in a few weeks when every American over 16 who wanted a vaccine should have gotten a vaccine. At that time, vaccine passes should be widely encouraged, which would further incentivize vaccination."

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