We are all in this together, Canada

Just like the WWI Christmas Truce of 1914 and the 9/11 terrorist attacks, human beings have been demonstrated time and time again that through crises, we are capable of coming together as a community.

Over 17,000 Canadians have been infected with the coronavirus. Over 44% of Canadians have lost their jobs. Children aren’t in school. The economy is falling apart, people are stuck at home, and no one has any idea when things will go back to normal.

The coronavirus has completely shattered the infrastructure of the entire world, and we have no idea what is going to happen next.

While it is easy to fall into the deep and dark circle of despair and uncertainty, there is a silver lining. Just like the WWI Christmas Truce of 1914 and the 9/11 terrorist attacks, human beings have been demonstrated time and time again that through crises, we are capable of coming together as a community.

The coronavirus pandemic has been no different.

In response to the pandemic, a woman from Ajax, Ontario, who wishes to be unnamed, is selling her old furniture and using the money to buy food baskets for those in need.

In Bracebridge, Ontario, Mel Lupton and Colby Jordan have offered grocery porch drop-offs to people in self-isolation and free warm dinners to those suffering financially during this difficult time.

Sam Yagnyatynskyiy from Barrie, Ontario was scrolling through Kijiji when he stumbled upon an ad posted by a mother asking for help. She had just returned from London, England with symptoms of a cold. Due to self-isolation as well as financial troubles, she was not able to purchase groceries for herself and her kids.

Sam reached out to her and took it upon himself to purchase and drop off her groceries, without asking for a penny in return.

“I saw somebody asking for help, and I wanted to help. I felt like I needed to help.”

Even businesses, from local to multi-million-dollar corporations, have revised their platforms to include more altruistic agendas.

A local dog training business in Barrie, Waterdogs K9 Center, has offered a free bag of Inukshuk dog food to clients that are first responders and healthcare workers, as a thank-you for their hard work.

Nike has made the premium version of their app free, providing a library of over 185 workouts for the growing number of people stuck at home.

Many small businesses have taken it upon themselves to offer free home deliveries, including Tail Blazers and Redline Brewhouse, and Hilary McMillan, a Toronto women’s wear designer, has redirected resources into making masks for donation to front-line workers.

While empty toilet paper aisles perpetuate the “every man for themselves” mentality, as people all over Ontario come together to help one another, Canadians prove that it’s not “every man for themselves.” In fact, we are all in this together.