Grammarly does the WHO’s bidding by censoring phrases like 'China Virus'

Grammarly insists: “Change the term. Phrases like China Virus can encourage bias and misinformation. Try using the official name used by the World Health Organization instead.”

As ordinary people try to flatten the curve and get on with their lives, the authoritarian bent of big tech just gets worse.

Grammarly, the popular spellcheck and grammar app, is now discouraging people from writing “Wuhan Virus” or “China Virus.” When you type in these commonly-used phrases, Grammarly offers the following instruction: “Change the term. Phrases like China Virus can encourage bias and misinformation. Try using the official name used by the World Health Organization instead.” Grammarly insists that its users write “COVID-19” or “coronavirus” instead.

Replacing the geographically accurate phrases “Wuhan Virus” and “China Virus” has nothing to do with grammar. This reprogramming of Grammarly and attempted reprogramming of the language we use is an example of capitulation to the will of China and the embattled World Health Organization, an institution that has been busted numerous times in recent weeks for doing communist China’s bidding.

The virus that was unleashed upon the world from Wuhan in China’s Hubei Province in January has been subject to discussion surrounding its name. While at first it was called the Wuhan Virus or China Virus, there was a major push among mainstream media outlets to change it to be something less informative and politically correct. The World Health Organization launched the narrative that to refer to the virus by its location was racist.

PBS reporter Yamiche Alcindor asked President Trump about his insistence on noting that the virus was from China as well. Trump noted that in fact the virus did originate in China.

The public has given over so much of its ability to speak freely to be corrected by apps. Autocorrect on smartphones, predictive text in email drafts, auto fill, auto search results, as well as grammar apps. We line up to hear the words we’re supposed to use, from those about identity to those about the location of viruses, so that we don’t find ourselves saying the wrong or harmful thing. What we continue to neglect to do is to think for ourselves, spell our own words, or finish our own sentences.

Grammarly is only the latest example of big tech trying to change the language that the public uses in order to influence how they think. But odds are they won’t be the last. As YouTube pushes creators to adhere to a WHO narrative, Facebook takes down citizens groups, and Twitter routinely bans those who don’t agree with leftist bias, it’s clear that our tech is doing more than giving us a platform, it is shaping the story along their own biased lines.