American News

Texas takes Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan and Wisconsin to Supreme Court over voting irregularities

"All these flaws – even the violations of state election law – violate one or more of the federal requirements for elections... and thus arise under federal law," the lawsuit stated.

Nicole Russell Texas, US
Join the ranks of independent, free thinkers by supporting us today for as little as $1.
Support The Post Millennial

If big tech continues censoring conservatives, that means our days on these platforms may be numbered. Please take a minute to sign up to our mailing list so we can stay in touch with you, our community. Subscribe Now!

On Monday the State of Texas brought a suit against Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan, and Wisconsin directly to the Supreme Court claiming these states violated the Constitution in a number of ways.

The case was added to the Supreme Court docket today.

Their lawsuit claims three things: These states violated the Electors Clause of the Constitution because voting procedures and rules were changed through the state's executive powers, not the legislature.

The suit alleges that the voting rules were inconsistent throughout each of the individual states, and that there were a number of "voting irregularities."

"All these flaws – even the violations of state election law – violate one or more of the federal requirements for elections... and thus arise under federal law," the lawsuit stated.

"Plaintiff State respectfully submits that the foregoing types of electoral irregularities exceed the hanging-chad saga of the 2000 election in their degree of departure from both state and federal law. Moreover, these flaws cumulatively preclude knowing who legitimately won the 2020 election and threaten to cloud all future elections."

Under Article III, the Supreme Court has exclusive jurisdiction over disputes between states—hence the direct petition—although that does not mean the Supreme Court will automatically hear Texas' case. Texas will need five Justices or more to agree to hear it.

Notably, Kyle Hawkins, the Texas Solicitor General who represents the State before the Supreme Court is absent from the court documents. Ken Paxton, Texas' Attorney General is the Counsel on record.

Join and support independent free thinkers!

We’re independent and can’t be cancelled. The establishment media is increasingly dedicated to divisive cancel culture, corporate wokeism, and political correctness, all while covering up corruption from the corridors of power. The need for fact-based journalism and thoughtful analysis has never been greater. When you support The Post Millennial, you support freedom of the press at a time when it's under direct attack. Join the ranks of independent, free thinkers by supporting us today for as little as $1.

Support The Post Millennial
Ads