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Turkey begins Syria attacks, targets Kurds

Thousands of Kurds are fleeing from cities near the Turkey-Syria border, as many in northern Syria prepare the Turkish assault which has been greenlit by American President Donald Trump.

This article was published more than 1 year ago, information might not be accurate.

Ali Taghva Montreal, QC

Thousands of Kurds are fleeing from cities near the Turkey-Syria border, as many in northern Syria prepare the Turkish assault which has been greenlit by American President Donald Trump.

While thousands attempt to flee, the battle has already begun.

According to a spokesperson for the United States-backed Syrian Democratic Forces, Turkish warplanes have already begun carrying out airstrikes and two civilians have already died.

In response to Turkey’s maneuvers in the region, politicians across the aisle have stated their opposition, although none have made any real efforts to stop the attacks which are currently raining down on cities like Qamishli.

American President Donald Trump has explicitly allowed the attacks into Northern Syria, while also commenting that should the Turkish army move too far, they will see serious economic ruining sanctions.

In Congress, some like Lindsey Graham have publically tweeted that bipartisan opposition would act as a red line to Turkish entry into Northern Syria. So far neither individuals warnings have stopped airstrikes on Kurdish areas.

While the United States has abandoned its ally, it has certainly not been the only western state to do.

In Canada, Trudeau could muster nothing more than a willingness to “[monitor] the situation closely.”

Even in Europe, leaders like Emmanuel Macron have only met with the Kurdish representatives, providing lip service where serious action is required.

Perhaps most worrying for the long-term stability of the region, the largely Kurdish led SDF has now been forced to halt anti ISIL operations due to the serious threat posed by Turkish attacks.

The halt in anti-ISIL operations combined with an even less stable Syria could prepare the groundwork for the terrorist state to once again grow in a power-vacuum.

Germany’s Foreign Minister has called Turkey out in this situation for “willingly risking further destabilizing the region and a resurgence of IS [ISIL]” by attacking northeastern Syria, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said.

“Syria needs stability and a political process… however, the Turkish offensive now threatens to cause a new humanitarian disaster,” Maas said in a statement, adding that Berlin would “urge Turkey to end its offensive and to pursue its security interests peacefully”.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg has also said Turkey should act with “restraint,” adding that it was important not to destabilise the region any further.

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Ali Taghva
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