American News Aug 23, 2020 9:25 PM EST

WATCH: Black woman accuses Asian tea shop owners of 'stealing black culture'

A black woman accused Asian business owners by saying that the name of the boba tea shop, "Trap Tea," was "stealing black culture."

WATCH: Black woman accuses Asian tea shop owners of 'stealing black culture'
Mia Cathell The Post Millennial
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A black woman accused Asian business owners by saying that the name of the boba tea shop, "Trap Tea," was "stealing black culture."

23-year-old Alewia Tola Roba walked into the newly-opened store in Aurora, Colorado, and berated the Asian-owned business on Friday, arguing that it had no right claiming that name which Roba considered African-American slang.

According to Urban Dictionary, a “trap house” is used to describe a "crack house," a place in a "shady neighborhood" where illegal drugs are manufactured, packaged for sale, or sold on the street.

Urban Dictionary: traphouse
Originally used to describe a crack house in a shady neighborhood, the word has since been abused by high school students who like to pretend they’re cool by drinking their mom’s beer together and saying they’re part of a “traphouse”.

Immediately after Roba ordered, she asked if the company is black-owned. The employee addressed her question and acknowledged that they are majority Indonesian.

That's when Roba accused Trap Tea of profiting off black culture.

“You’re using black culture to gain customers. This establishment is not black-owned, but you’re stealing black culture,” the proud Ethiopian filmed herself chasticizing.

Roba continued to interrupt responses: “No! You’re thieves—Asian people stealing black culture once again.”

"It’s okay. You’ll be exposed," she added, repeating the same accusations.

The server originally waiting on Roba then thanked her for her payment despite her disapproving differences. "No! I came here because I thought it was black-owned," Roba clarified, supposedly telling her friends that she was supporting a "black business."

When a black customer attempted to defend Trap Tea, Roba called the man a racial slur before the video cut off.

"You're a c**n! Don't talk!" Roba told the black man.

Trap Tea released a statement via Instagram yesterday to address the incident, explaining that the name is derived from the store's "appreciation of black southern culture" and the "grind, hustle, and drive" poured into the brand by friends and family who have helped to make the endeavor possible.

View this post on Instagram

Today has been an interesting day and we have received a ton of exposure. Some good and some bad but at the end of the day we want everyone to know that trap tea is about love and bringing everyone together. The name came from the appreciation of black southern culture and the grind , hustle , and drive that we put into the brand and the friends and family we have collaborated with to make that possible. The logo is a flip on the dragon ball z kame house from the popular anime show. We just want to know we don’t hate anyone and we spoke about the situation and we told her about our ideas and plans for the future. We explained that again this was about appreciation of the culture and bringing a dope spin for everyone to come enjoy something new. While also collaborating with other minorities with pop ups , merch ideas , and food to also support the community. We currently work with creative director Maurice Anderson ( @underratedphotography ) on projects and ideas and we have a mural planned showing our appreciation. Let’s keep working together as a unit. Appreciate you all for the love and support. - trap tea

A post shared by Trap Tea (@trap_tea_aurora) on

The shop went on to clarify its logo is a "flip" on the Kame House from Dragon Ball Z, a popular Japanese anime show.

The account then announced that the owners spoke with Roba about the situation, informing her of their ideas and plans for the future which includes collaborating with minorities to produce pop-ups, merchandise, and food to support the community.

"We explained that again this was about appreciation of the culture and bringing a dope spin for everyone to come enjoy something new," Trap Tea wrote.

The business currently works with Maurice Anderson, black creative director of Underrated Photography, on projects and soon a mural to illustrate the store's cultural "appreciation"—not cultural appropriation.

"Let’s keep working together as a unit. Appreciate you all for the love and support," Trap Tea signed off.

Asian Dawn reported that the black woman filmed the altercation using "Asian Tech culture."

"From the Korean-American who co-invented MOSFET, which allows smartphones to exists today, a TSMC 7-nanometer chip in her phone, Samsung OLED technology to a Sony camera; she’s 'stealing' Asian culture, which is as iconic as German engineering or Italian fashion," the editorial team pointed out.

The Post Millennial reached out to Roba and Trap Tea for comment and have not heard back by the time of publication.

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