WATCH: CTV's 'The Social' says Canada owes reparations towards African-Canadians

One host said that "Black Africans were enslaved in Canada from 1600 to 1834." What she failed to mention, however, was that Canada only achieved confederation in 1867.

Two television hosts on CTV's "The Social" have expressed some radical views on race relations in Canada on Monday.

One host, Melissa Grelo, said that "Black Africans were enslaved in Canada from 1600 to 1834." What she failed to mention, however, was that Canada only achieved confederation in 1867.

Grelo chooses 1834 due to it being the date when the British Empire's slavery abolition act came into effect. This act effectively bought and then released every slave in the Empire's territory—only being paid off by the British public in 2015.  

As a result of this, Grelo's anger should be directed towards the British Empire which—like CTV's "The Social"—no longer has any relevance or prominence in modern Canadian society.

Despite these being basic historical facts, a second host, Lainey Lui, ploughed on with Canada's supposed role in supporting slavery.

"The Canadian government, the Trudeau government has been delaying and sidestepping, and not really willing [sic] to talk about what compensation should look like; how much that compensation will be."

Continuing on with her semi-literate diatribe, Lui said that her "first thought when I heard about this is if you put it in an official document from the government acknowledging the existence of systemic racism, does that mean the next step is action?"  

Allow me to expound upon Lui's and Grelo's argument. These two hosts would have the Canadian public pay compensation towards African-Canadians for crimes neither they nor their ancestors have committed.