ADVERTISEMENT

Google, YouTube spend MILLIONS to launch Global Fact Check Fund

The move, which marks the companies' largest fact-checking grant to date, comes as they continue to ramp up their fight against "misinformation" online.

ADVERTISEMENT
Image
Jarryd Jaeger Vancouver, BC
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

On Tuesday, Google and YouTube announced that they will be providing a $13.2 million grant to the nonprofit Poynter Institute's International Fact Checking Network with the goal of launching a new "Global Fact Check Fund," set to launch in early 2023.

The move, which marks the companies' largest fact-checking grant to date, comes as they continue to ramp up their fight against "misinformation" online.

According to Google and YouTube, the grant will "support [the Poynter Institute's] network of 135 fact-checking organizations from 65 countries covering over 80 languages."

The companies justified their decision by noting that "helping people to identify misinformation is a global challenge."

"The Global Fact Check Fund," they explained, "will help fact-checkers to scale existing operations or launch new ones that elevate information, uplift credible sources and reduce the harm of mis- and disinformation around the globe."

Organizations are expected to use the funding to "incorporate new technologies, create or expand digital footprints, optimize verification tools, and increase their capacities to deepen audience engagement through innovative storytelling formats such as audio, video, or podcasts."

"The world needs fact-checking more than ever before," IFCN executive director Baybars Örsek said. "This partnership with Google and YouTube infuses financial support to global fact-checkers and is a step in the right direction, and while there’s much work to be done, this partnership has sparked meaningful collaboration and an important step.

In recent years, investments in programs aimed at tackling mis- and disinformation online have grown in tandem with peoples' interest and awareness in the subject. 

According to data from Google, in October 2022, interest in mis- and disinformation across the world reached its highest point since 2004, when records began, with the most pressing topic being the Covid-19 pandemic.

During the pandemic, big tech's fact-checking apparatus went into overdrive as companies struggled to keep up with information that seemed to be changing on a daily, if not hourly basis. 

YouTube has been criticized for its crackdowns on those who shared ideas that opposed the mainstream, many of whom have had their views vindicated in the months since.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Google_YT

Join and support independent free thinkers!

We’re independent and can’t be cancelled. The establishment media is increasingly dedicated to divisive cancel culture, corporate wokeism, and political correctness, all while covering up corruption from the corridors of power. The need for fact-based journalism and thoughtful analysis has never been greater. When you support The Post Millennial, you support freedom of the press at a time when it's under direct attack. Join the ranks of independent, free thinkers by supporting us today for as little as $1.

Support The Post Millennial

Remind me next month

To find out what personal data we collect and how we use it, please visit our Privacy Policy

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy
ADVERTISEMENT
© 2023 The Post Millennial, Privacy Policy