Nancy Pelosi won't commit to coronavirus relief vote

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi took the House of Representatives out of session and didn't commit to a vote on a Senate bill passed on Tuesday Night.
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi took the House of Representatives out of session and didn't commit to a vote on a Senate bill passed on Tuesday Night.

On Wednesday, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi took the House of Representatives out of session and did not commit to a vote on a Senate bill that was passed on Tuesday Night.

The Daily Wire reported that Pelosi went against a bipartisan coronavirus relief package worth trillions, using her own 1,400 page bill.

On Tuesday, Pelosi issued a statement saying, “House Democrats will now review the final provisions and legislative text of the agreement to determine a course of action.”

She stopped before committing to bring the bill to the floor so the House of Commons could vote on it. The bill was negotiated for five days and is now in limbo.

Pelosi said that the negotiations had taken Congress “a long way down the road in meeting the needs of the American people.”

“Thanks to the unity and insistence of Senate and House Democrats, the bill has moved a great deal closer to America’s workers.”

On Wednesday, when the House was brought into session, it seemed that Pelosi did not want the bill to be reviewed by House members. In less than three minutes, the House was out of session.

“House was in this morning at 10 a.m. and 42 seconds. Out at 10:02 and 37 seconds No business of note. No resignations, etc. Back in tomorrow at 11 a.m.,” reported Jake Sherman of Politico on Wednesday.

He added, “To be abundantly, 100 percent clear: This means the House is not likely to vote on the Senate’s coronavirus bill today.”

Heather Coyle from Politico said, “Pelosi also said there’s ‘no way’ to pass the bill on the House floor today.”

The legislation has not yet been moved through the Senate though it is likely that it will be passed at some point today. It was expected that the House would vote on the bill with unanimous consent if Pelosi listened to Schumer's negotiations.

A “more just” relief was discussed in an online meet up with the socialist Center for Popular Democracy showing that the House would be more divided on the bill.