ADVERTISEMENT

Police able to access Amazon Ring recordings without warrant or user permission

Amazon's response confirmed that the company has provided law enforcement with Ring videos at least 11 times over the past seven months alone.

ADVERTISEMENT
Image
Joshua Young Youngsville North Carolina
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Amazon devices like Ring and Echo are recording footage that is being accessed by police without a warrant, due process, or user consent. The revelation comes after Amazon sent a July 13 response to questions raised by Senator Ed Markey revealing the existence of a web page that law enforcement can use to access a user's footage under the banner of an emergency.

Human Events Daily host Jack Posobiec said that "If you've got a camera that's hooked up to your house, and that camera's running through a network" then "you're not the only person that has access to that video."

Posobiec clarifies that the existence of these devices "created a mass surveillance network across the entire country. They are now able to monitor everything that's taking place on almost every street, every town, every city, in every state across the entire nation."

In his June 14 letter to Amazon, Markey wrote, "[Ring’s] surveillance system threatens the public in ways that go far beyond abstract privacy invasion: individuals may use Ring devices' audio recordings to facilitate blackmail, stalking, and other damaging practices."

The senator sent the request to Amazon so they could "address ongoing issues related to privacy violations and data sharing with police departments."

Amazon's response confirmed that the company has provided law enforcement with Ring videos at least 11 times over the past seven months alone.

Markey told The Intercept that, "This revelation is particularly troubling given that the company has previously admitted to having no policies that restrict how law enforcement can use Ring users' footage, no data security requirements for law enforcement entities that have users' footage, and no policies that prohibit law enforcement officers from keeping Ring users' footage forever."

Furthermore the devices' Terms of Service say nothing about this use of footage and do not warn consumers their video could be used in this way.

Posobiec backed up Markey's concerns over Amazon's relationship with authorities and said, "we know that Amazon has relationships with the national security state. We know that Amazon has their business dealings, and we know at the end of the day, they are all about making money."

The Human Events Daily host asked, "should we have legislation in this country to determine how this mass surveillance system works?"

As The Verge notes that "it does seem to be true that federal law lets Amazon give this kind of information to a government agency, 'if the provider, in good faith, believes that an emergency involving danger of death or serious physical injury to any person requires disclosure without delay.'" The law is 18 U.S. Code § 2702 or "Voluntary disclosure of customer communications or record.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
N/A by N/A is licensed under N/A

Join and support independent free thinkers!

We’re independent and can’t be cancelled. The establishment media is increasingly dedicated to divisive cancel culture, corporate wokeism, and political correctness, all while covering up corruption from the corridors of power. The need for fact-based journalism and thoughtful analysis has never been greater. When you support The Post Millennial, you support freedom of the press at a time when it's under direct attack. Join the ranks of independent, free thinkers by supporting us today for as little as $1.

Support The Post Millennial

Remind me in September

We will use this to send you a single email in September 2020. To find out what personal data we collect and how we use it, please visit our Privacy Policy

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy
ADVERTISEMENT
© 2022 The Post Millennial, Privacy Policy