WATCH: Elderly woman schools dopey counter protestor at Save Teddy Roosevelt statue rally in NYC

“You’re bigots!” The white, teen BLM protestor says. “Is that the best you’ve got, doll?” The woman responds. “Is that the best you got, baby boy?”

A patriotic protest erupted in front of the American Museum of Natural History in New York today, to save yet another statue from being torn down, President Teddy Roosevelt. This time it was a statue of a man who didn’t own slaves, who founded the Progressive political party, who believed in conservation so much that he created numerous national parks, who was so interested in equality that Booker T. Washington was his adviser, and became the first black man to be invited to a White House dinner, under Roosevelt.

One woman, a classic New Yorker, told the few counter protestors, who showed up after most of the Save Teddy protestors had left, exactly what the children protestors could do with their intent to destroy Teddy and American history.

“You hear that?” She said. “You are the radical left, you are domestic terrorists. And we will see to it that you fall, and you will fall so hard you won’t know what hit you.”

A white teen tries to get in her face, and yells “you’re f***ing privileged,” but it stopped by an adult, a black man, who suggests he move back.

“Who you talking to, punk?” The woman asks. “You got something to say little boy? No you don’t, do you.”

“Go stand over there,” the boy says to his elder.

“No I’ll stand wherever I want and you can stand wherever you want,” she says.

The boy goes on to try to explain what he thinks Teddy Roosevelt represents, but the woman is not having it.

“I think you guys represent something very bad,” he tells her.

“Tell me a little about yourself,” she asks, “where are you from?”

“I’m from NYC,” the kid says, “where the f*** are you from?” At this point his young colleague points to show the woman where she should stand.

“I can walk where I want,” the woman says. “Learn your history!” She tells them. “If you learn your history, you wouldn’t be a radical.”

The white, teen BLM protestor says “you’re bigots!”

“Is that the best you’ve got, doll?” The woman responds. “Is that the best you got, baby boy?”

The nearly 200 protestors waved American flags as they gathered around the statue, and at one point broke into an impromptu rendition of the national anthem, the Star Spangled Banner.

They also gave the NYPD, who were on hand as they are for all of New York’s planned protests, a solid cheer.

The protestors were not loud enough to drown out a New York street preacher, who saw the captive crowd and decided to spread his Christian message. The New York Daily News called these “counter protestors,” but it was really just one loud guy, with a few friends, standing in the shade, along with dozens of the Save Teddy protestors.

The Save Teddy protest was organized by The Federalist’s David Marcus, Young Americans for Freedom and the New York City Young Republicans’ Club.

Marcus told The Post Millennial that the reason he came up with the idea for the protest because “Teddy Roosevelt believed in an America with no hyphens. No white-Americans, no black-Americans, no brown-Americans. Just Americans. We are not step siblings squabbling over an estate. We are full blooded brothers and sisters entrusted with the greatest experiment in freedom the world has ever known.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio and the Board of the American Museum of Natural History have teamed up to approve the removal of a statue of the Museum’s founder, President Teddy Roosevelt, from the front of the main entrance. The move has been lauded by social justice warriors and wokesters alike who decry the statue because in addition to Teddy, beloved 26th president of the United States, a Native American and a black man stand on either side.

Their contention is that these men do not appear as equals to the president, but rather as supporters, which undoubtedly they were, as was Roosevelt of them, and the nation. Evidence for their inequity, to the eyes of these 21st century students of something other than history, is that Roosevelt sits astride a horse, while the men stand at his side. However, the man was president, and a rancher, and in the cavalry during the Spanish-American war, so perhaps it was not an unmerited nod to his stature.