Use code TPM for up to 66% off at MyPillow.com

ADVERTISEMENT

Bears looking at leaving downtown Chicago despite $2.2 BILLION promise from mayor

Soldier Field has been home to the Bears for over 50 years and is the oldest in the NFL, but that may be soon to change.

ADVERTISEMENT
Image
Roberto Wakerell-Cruz Montreal QC
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

The NFL's historic Chicago Bears franchise is considering moving from their longtime home stadium of Soldier Field, despite the best efforts of city Mayor Lori Lightfoot.

Soldier Field has been home to the Bears for over 50 years and is the oldest in the NFL, but that may be soon to change. Last year, the team's ownership reached an agreement on a 326-acre site in the much safer Chicago suburbs. The Bears' purchase is now pending, with a number of "logistical, financial, and legal loops both sides" need to figure out, reports The Guardian.

The Bears seem intent on moving despite efforts from Lightfoot. Soldier Field is the smallest in the league and is not eligible to host events like the Super Bowl or the World Cup. It received $600 million in 2003 which went to waste after few meaningful renovations were done. Lightfoot's plans would cost as much as $2.2 billion. Lightfoot has not said who would fund the plans but noted that selling the naming rights for the stadium is a possibility.

The Bears have already hired an architecture firm to help design a new stadium. The Bears on Monday rereleased a statement they had put out earlier in July that laid out their plans to move.

"The only potential project the Chicago Bears are exploring for a new stadium development is Arlington Park," the Bears said. "As part of our mutual agreement with the seller of that property, we are not pursuing alternative stadium deals or sites, including renovations to Soldier Field, while we are under contract. We have informed the city of Chicago that we intend to honor our contractual commitments as we continue our due diligence and predevelopment activities on the Arlington Heights property."

The Bears' exit from the city core would leave a lacuna in the downtown core. The Bears attracted 486,675 people to home games during the 2021 NFL season, selling out 989 percent of their capacity, on average. That total number, however, is the third lowest in the league, ahead of just Washington and Detroit.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
N/A by N/A is licensed under N/A

Join and support independent free thinkers!

We’re independent and can’t be cancelled. The establishment media is increasingly dedicated to divisive cancel culture, corporate wokeism, and political correctness, all while covering up corruption from the corridors of power. The need for fact-based journalism and thoughtful analysis has never been greater. When you support The Post Millennial, you support freedom of the press at a time when it's under direct attack. Join the ranks of independent, free thinkers by supporting us today for as little as $1.

Support The Post Millennial

Remind me in September

We will use this to send you a single email in September 2020. To find out what personal data we collect and how we use it, please visit our Privacy Policy

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
By signing up you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy
ADVERTISEMENT
© 2022 The Post Millennial, Privacy Policy