Here's what will be in Trump's social media executive order today

The draft order accuses big tech of "invoking inconsistent, irrational, and groundless justifications to censor or otherwise punish Americans' speech here at home."

Yesterday, CNN's Kaitlan Collins reported that Press secretary Kayleigh McEnany had told reporters that President Trump would be signing "some kind of executive order on social media." No further details were given, but only a day later, some information about the order has been revealed.

The order came only days after Twitter labelled two of the president's tweets as "potentially misleading." The labelling came after Trump tweeted that mail-in voting would cause voter fraud. Trump took offence to the fact-check, accusing Twitter and other tech-giants of misuse of power.

A draft of the order reads, "In a country that has long cherished the freedom of expression, we cannot allow a limited number of online platforms to hand-pick the speech that Americans may access and convey online ... This practice is fundamentally un-American and anti-democratic. When large, powerful social media companies censor opinions with which they disagree, they exercise a dangerous power."

The draft order accuses big tech of  "invoking inconsistent, irrational, and groundless justifications to censor or otherwise punish Americans' speech here at home."

The order is expected to gain a decent amount of support from within the party, including from the likes of Florida Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz, who told CNN that "Twitter is engaging in 2020 election interference. They are putting their thumb on the scale ... The notion that they would outsource fact checking to people who have been wrong about everything is an insult."

Twitter's credibility also came into question after their integrity chief, Yoel Roth, published a tweet stating that there were "literal nazis" in the White House.

This sparked a response from Kellyanne Conway, who told Fox & Friends that Roth had a big storm coming his way from Trumpers.

Roth had also previously tweeted "I’m just saying, we fly over those states that voted for a racist tangerine for a reason."

The order would essentially make it easier for tech companies to be sued, something that until now has been protected by a 1996 law that protects websites from lawsuits.