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News Analysis Apr 4, 2022 4:17 PM EST

Trudeau Liberals back at it again with new internet censorship bill

A new internet censorship bill has been unveiled by the Trudeau Liberals, and this time it is being championed by new censorship czar, Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez.

Trudeau Liberals back at it again with new internet censorship bill
Roberto Wakerell-Cruz Montreal, QC

A new internet censorship bill has been unveiled by the Trudeau Liberals, and this time it is being championed by new censorship czar, Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez.

MPs will soon debate the controversial bill, which will pick up where the controversial Bill C-10 left off last year. That bill passed in the House of Commons in June of last year, but failed to pass the Senate before Parliament was dissolved, leading to last year's federal election.

C-10 was highly controversial in both Parliament and the Senate, with Senator David Richards saying that the legislation needed to be scrapped altogether, as it aimed to give the CRTC overwhelming new powers, something that even former vice-chair of the CRTC Peter Menzies called a violation of the rights of ordinary citizens.

Bill C-11, 10's sole successor, titled "An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts," strives for the same goals as C-10, which was created and championed by now-Minister of the Environment Steven Guilbeault, who was Heritage Minister last year.

Guilbeault himself had trouble defending all aspects of his bill, leading to embarrassing interviews with the CBC.

As reported by The Post Millennial last year: Bill C-10, spearheaded by Guilbeault, would "regulate the internet and social media in the same way that it regulates national broadcasting." When asked what the effects of the bill might look like, he stated that Canadians would see "more 'indigenous storytelling' as well as content from 'racialized community-owned media.'" He also said that the enforcement of his internet censorship bill must adhere to "the government's vision."

"The bill is about ensuring that these platforms that act like broadcasters pay their fair share when it comes to Canadian culture," said Guilbeault. "It's about spending obligations. ... It's not about content moderation," Guilbeault said.

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