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New York mayor and governor team up to create gun control workarounds after SCOTUS 2A victory

The state is now considering limiting areas where concealed guns are permitted and calling them "sensitive locations."

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Joshua Young Youngsville North Carolina
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Unelected New York Governor Kathy Hochul and NYC Mayor Eric Adams announced on June 23 their intentions to create new, restrictive gun legislation to circumvent the recent SCOTUS ruling banning constraints on conceal carry permits in New York.

On June 23 the Supreme Court of the United States struck down a New York gun-control law that required citizens to show "proper cause" to obtain a concealed carry license. According to local news, when the ruling came down Governor Hochul said that none of the rules in New York would immediately change and she feared citizens would "rush to get concealed carry permits, using the decision as justification."

New York City Mayor Adams said during a press conference, "The decision ignores this shocking crisis of gun violence every day engulfing not only New York, but engulfing our entire country." Despite New York's already strict gun laws, while Mayor Adams has been mayor his city has seen a surge in violent crime upwards of 40 percent higher than 2021.

Both Mayor Adams and Governor Hochul agree that more gun laws are the answer.

According to The Daily Mail, Hochul intends to get around the Supreme Court's decision by focusing on location rather than person when it comes to concealed firearms.

The state is now considering limiting areas where concealed guns are permitted and calling them "sensitive locations."

The "sensitive location" designation would conceivably use population density, like at stadiums, and proximity to public transportation as the determining factor for who can carry a gun.

Hochul admitted that the new criteria could easily extend to define the entirety of New York City, or any major city, as a "sensitive location." When asked if cities writ large were "sensitive locations," she responded, "in my opinion, they are"

Prior to the Supreme Court's ruling, Governor Hochul and the state Legislature had recently passed a batch of the country's strictest gun laws. Some of the new statutes included raising the long gun purchasing age to 21, criminalizing body armor, and instituting several controversial "red flag laws."

Red flag laws are often cited as violations of the 14th amendment, as was the concealed carry law which was struck down. In that 1913 law "proper cause" was inadequately defined.

NYC's Mayor  Adams affirmed all of Hochul's efforts and further explained some of the new gun control efforts on Twitter. Adams wrote that state and city officials should implement a "review of our application process" indicating that another law would be requiring gun applicants to show that they've received some kind of training.

Adams summarized his efforts by saying that he can't allow a city already marked by record high crime to become the "Wild West."

A recent Buffalo mass shooting was carried out despite the implementation of the restrictive laws the Supreme Court shot down.

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