Opinion

New York Times sells out Hong Kong to Communist China

The New York Times published a shocking opinion piece which openly advocates for Hong Kong to be ceded to the Chinese mainland, saying that "its destiny is intertwined with the mainland's."

Collin Jones The Post Millennial
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The New York Times published a shocking opinion piece written by Regina Ip in which she openly advocates for Hong Kong to be ceded to the Chinese mainland, saying that "its destiny is intertwined with the mainland's."

Amid the heated protests enacted by pro-democracy Hong Kongers, Ip argued that the protests had gotten out of hand over a bill that has long been withdrawn—the extradition bill— saying that China finally stepped in and did something about it.

Ip wrote that "the scale and frequency of antigovernment protests has now subsided—thanks to a national security law for Hong Kong promulgated in Beijing on June 30." As a result, "several prominent democracy advocates have since announced their retirement from politics, disbanded their parties or fled the city."

Ip continued by saying that the "West tends to glorify these people as defenders of Hong Kong’s freedoms, but they have done great harm to the city by going against its constitutional order and stirring up chaos and disaffection toward our motherland."

The article noted that the Hong Kong government "has not been able" to remedy many major issues in the city, let "alone restore public trust or win back hearts and minds." Ip draws out that "about 28 people have been arrested under the law," noting the case of a "23-year-old man accused of driving a motorbike into police officers and displaying a banner that read 'Liberate Hong Kong, Revolution of Our Times.' His case is being dealt with in accordance with due process and our criminal laws."

Also alarming is that The Times appears to not have a problem with the vandalism, arson, burglary, burning, looting, assault, and murder that has taken place in the US amid the death of George Floyd, but they suddenly have a problem when lesser modes of protest are used by pro-democracy advocates to push back against a major communist power.

Ip concluded the bizarre piece by saying that "like it or not, Hong Kong is part of China. And given the two's vast disparity in size and Hong Kong's growing economic dependence on the mainland, the city's progressive integration with China is unavoidable."

China has exerted increasing control on Hong Kong since protests began in 2019 against the extradition bill, which would have seen Hong Kongers tried for crimes committed in Hong Kong in mainland Chinese courts. As the CCP has pushed further into Hong Kong affairs, the US pulled back their "special arrangement" with Hong Kong."

Ip said that Hong Kong's goal should not be for independence, or to retain their special status, but to attempt to remain "the freest and most international city in China." Ip notes that it is thanks to Hong Kong's international status that the city has "many bilateral agreements with foreign countries and its membership in numerous international organizations." As with the US, however, there is the possibility that these agreements will dry up as Hong Kong's freedoms ebb.

She further notes that foreign governments should not be concerned about the reduction of freedoms and the dismantling of the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong, because they are making a mistake by measuring "what happens in Hong Kong against standards that prevail in Western countries," stating that there are political differences between western nations and the Chinese Communist Party, seeming to conclude that the communist system is valid.

"Instead," Ip writes, "they should benchmark Hong Kong against the rest of China, and measure how the city can maintain its unique characteristics — openness, a commitment to personal rights and freedoms, respect for the rule of law and the ability to reinvent itself economically. Beijing's national security law is saving 'one country, two systems' by ensuring that Hong Kong does not become a danger to China."

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